Assignment Prompt

The credit-bearing classroom provides librarians with expanded opportunities to connect with students as teachers, mentors, and advocates. Both the content and approach of one-shot sessions are often driven by faculty requests for resource-based instruction. Librarians teaching credit-bearing classes do not face the same constraints on their time with students or limitations on instructional content. Accordingly, librarians in credit-bearing settings can go beyond demonstrating databases or teaching discrete skills to engage students in learning research concepts and to advocate for information- related social justice issues. One such advocacy issue is copyleft, a movement responding to the constraints of traditional copyright by allowing the licensed work to be used, modified, and distributed as determined by the work’s creator. By introducing students to the copyleft movement, librarians can encourage students to make their works more freely available and to engage in the conversation of scholarship. This chapter presents a case study of a research methods course in which students created and embedded Creative Commons licenses in digital platforms in order to encourage learners to critically evaluate the production and value of information.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND
These .pdfs offer students examples of three different search strategies.  Students can then construct their own on the 2nd page.  These exercises can be used to assess student understnading of keywords and Boolean operators.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as InquirySearching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Comment envoyer une minorité d'étudiants surmotivés sur des objectifs pédagogiques intégrés et connexes dont le parcours est structuré ?1) Faire une courte introduction engageante (15min.) 2) Identifier la minorité surmotivée et leur distribuer un parcours. 3) Assurer une supervision mininal avec un suivi distant et ponctuel au besoin.Avec 2 exemples de parcours: une auto-initiation en 5 niveaux pour contribuer à Wikipédia; et un programme de 12 semaines pour démarrer un blogue sur un sujet de recherche.How to get the few really motivated students involved? By asking them to fulfil « side-quests » learning activities in a structured itinerary : 1) Present a short but engaging initiation [sur quoi?] (15 min.) ;2) After identifying the motivated students, give them a formal checklist [pour quoi?];3) If needed, provide minimum mentoring and follow-upHere are two examples : 5-steps self-initiation on how to contribute to Wikipedia and 12-weeks program to start a blog on research topic.
Contributor: Pascal Martinolli
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This template gives space to outline an Information Literacy session, allowing a department to create a more cohesive program, or a single librarian to maintain an organized sense of their own sessions.This single page template gives space for teaching and learning activities, applying a frame, tools used for the session, assesment techniques used, time taken, as well as assigning it to a course and instructor.
Contributor: Hanna Primeau
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
An explanation of different kinds of authority that students might recognize in a piece of information accompanied by a list of articles about global warming that appeal to, invoke, or otherwise discuss these authorities.  Students should skim one or more of the articles, answer some questions about them, and discuss their ideas with their peers.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Discipline(s): InterdisciplinaryOther
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This exercise offers students a list of curated links that they will use to complete an assigned project on green roofs.  Students must evaluate, summarize, annotate, cite, and synthezize the materials in a completed document containing an ultimate recommendation for a course of action. Requires EBSCO access.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Assignment Prompt
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
A guide to helping student know how to use (or not to use!) the different kinds of information they may find.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as ProcessScholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
This exercise gives students a model for approaching a research task, beginning with general information and ending with more in-depth sources. Discussion can focus on research as inquiry, research as strategic exploration, and the context and construction of authority. Students are required to cite their sources using both MLA and APA.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Assignment Prompt
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
The assignment prompt and description, Exploring Expertise, is attached. It is a writing prompt for a short assignment. The prompt can be adapted to fit different non-writing performance tasks, however, including discussion or in-class individual/ small group activities. Students are provided a scenario wherein they must research the names of experts quoted in different online news articles (topic: prescription drug abuse). They must show that they have researched the "expert." Learning Outcome - Explore a source of information in order to determine the validity and credibility of their claims on a particular topic  
Contributor: Cristy Moran
Resource Type(s): ActivityAssignment Prompt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
For a performance task/ assignment, students will be expected to find evidence to investigate a pseudoscientific claim or conspiracy theory. They will be submitting a two-page paper to their Chemistry professor in which they make a case that either supports the claim or rejects it. They will be expected to use both library and credible online sources for support. The performance task will follow a full 75-minute library instruction session in which students will learn to:construct various search phrases for use in online and library search tools  use certain evaluation criteria (e.g. CRAAP) to assess the credibility of online sources  examine sources for relevance to their research question and search need (specifically, to determine credibility of claims)Throughout the class, an example claim will be used for searches. Either one of the following is recommended:Feng Shui – or the arrangement of furniture according to Chinese philosophy – can positively or negatively impact your wealth, health, happiness, and prosperity.President John F. Kennedy was not assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald – or his assassination is the result of a conspiracy of various entities and agents. Materials included:The full sequenced instruction outline for the face-to-face library instruction session. The assignment prompt for the performance task. CRAAP handout. 
Contributor: Cristy Moran
Resource Type(s): ActivityAssignment Prompt
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY

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