Scholarship as Conversation

First of two library sessions provided to a introductory writing course. This session focuses on conducting research.
Contributor: Justina Elmore
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as ProcessScholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
Frame: Scholarship as ConversationContext: Lesson presented in the context of a one-shot, 50-minute library instruction session, with course libguide containing the multimedia presentations used for the lesson, organized in either boxes or tabs. Appropriate supplementary instructional content can be added to the libguide as needed.Lesson:Librarian overview of the frame of “Scholarship as Conversation” and why it is relevant to the students and their academic work. Focus on regarding scholarship as not a static “truth” frozen in time, but a process whereby researchers are in a continuum of inquiry and within which variation in research results comprises a “scholarly conversation.”Present Youtube video produced by librarian Anna Eisen entitled “Research 101: Scholarship as Conversation” accessible at https://youtu.be/YGia3gNyHDM to introduce the threshold concept.Next, present an NPR episode of the podcast “The Hidden Brain: A Conversation about Life’s Unseen Patterns” hosted by Shankar Vedantam, entitled “Scientific Findings Often Fail To Be Replicated, Researchers Say” aired on NPR on August 28, 2015 (access at: http://www.npr.org/2015/08/28/435416046/research-results-often-fail-to-be-replicated-researchers-say) Vedantam described a project headed by Dr. Brian Nosek at the University of Virginia in which researchers tried to replicate a hundred psychology experiments that were published in three leading journals. The results of the project were disappointing—nearly two thirds of the results of the experiments could not be replicated. Replication of results is a gold standard to measure quality of scientific research. An anecdotal topic referred to in the podcast was the research related to the health effects of coffee on the human body. Coffee and its health benefits (or lack thereof) are frequently discussed in the news media and was adopted as an example to utilize for an active learning component during the library instruction session.Distribute copies of the article “Health Effects of Coffee: Where Do We Stand?” at http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/14/health/coffee-health/index.html by Sandee LaMotte and published on the CNN website on August 14, 2015.  This article presents a chronology of “conventional wisdom,” popular beliefs, and research findings regarding the health effects of coffee intake from the 1500s to the present.Request that students break up into pairs, and review and discuss the article on coffee in light of the information they have just taken in via the the Youtube video and the NPR story.After 10 minutes, prompt and encourage the students to share their thoughts, analyses, conclusions, and insights regarding the content presented.Circle back to course purview and research assignments, and emphasize to students that they are “emerging researchers and emerging scholars” and they are the next participants in the conversation. They may be the contributors of new research knowledge in the future. 
Contributor: Jenny Innes
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
This handout provides a crosswalk between the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education.  Librarians using this handout are prompted to describe their past instruction and service experiences that are related to each frame for the purposes of sparking ideas for programming and learning activities related to the Framework. The handout is designed to ease the transition from using the Standards to embracing the Framework in instruction and programming.  The FIU Information Litearcy Framework combines the Outcomes of the Standards with the Knowledge Practices of the Framework to provide assessable indicators of information literacy competencies in students.
Contributor: Ava Brillat
Resource Type(s): Instruction Program Material
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
I wrote "How Information Works:ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Lay Language" for a faculty workshop we held at Ohio University called, "Reimagining the Research Project."  Later, the Learner-Centered Teaching team took the "Actions" and/or "Attitudes" from that restatement and wrote rubrics for each frame. We chose just one Action or Attitude per frame to rubric-ize. These are still in draft form. Our intention here is to greatly simplify the language so faculty can more easily understand our purpose. I have linked to our page, where several versions can be accessed: simple (b/w), color handout, long version with attitudes and  actions from novice to expert, and draft rubrics.  
Contributor: sherri saines
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in College and Undergraduate Libraries on November 18, 2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10691316.2017.1246396  Abstract: Threshold concepts theory and learning outcomes represent two different ways of thinking about teaching and learning. Finding a way to translate between the two is necessary for librarians who may wish to use concepts from the Framework for Information Literacy to shape their instruction. The following article outlines a process for transforming concepts from the “Scholarship as Conversation” frame into learning outcomes that the author developed as part of a tutorial project. This process can easily be adapted to a variety of instructional situations.
Contributor: Allison Hosier
Resource Type(s): Publication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationFramework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The Inform Your Thinking video series introduces students to the frames of the ACRL Framework in an easy-to-understand manner by using conversational tone, approachable peer hosts, relatable comparisons, and eye-catching graphics. This video introduces students to the Scholarship as Conversation frame by comparing research to conversations between different “voices” that each contribute a unique perspective on a topic. Students will explore useful tips on becoming a part of this conversation within their specific field of study, as well as how to decipher the voices in certain conversations.
Contributor: Cristina Colquhoun
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This lesson plan from Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts, edited by Patricia Bravender, Hazel McClure, and Gayle Schaub and contributed by Andrea Baer, introduces students to the idea that scholarship is a conversation.
Resource Type(s): Lesson PlanPublication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Jenny Yap and Sonia Robles, helps introduce first-year English and ESL composition students to the differences between scholarly and popular sources.
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Nick Ferreira and Mackenzie Salisbury, is an exercise for students who understand the basic concepts of research in a college library, but need a quick refresher on college-level research and practical knowledge of their new library’s logistics.
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
Short Video: What is a literature review? What purpose does it serve in research? What should you expect when writing one? Find out here...
Contributor: Jesse Lopez
Resource Type(s): Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationSearching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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