Scholarship as Conversation

An interactive tutorial that helps students learn what scholarly articles are, how to find them, and how to read them using the "Scholarship as Conversation" frame as a lens.
Contributor: Allison Hosier
Resource Type(s): Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The Un-Research Project was created and implemented by Allison Hosier as part of a credit-bearing information literacy course in 2014. The project, a twist on the traditional annotated bibliography, and its connections to themes from the ACRL Framework were detailed in an article published in Communications in Information Literacy in 2015.This resource includes a list of materials associated with the project that can be adapted for use for anyone interested in implementing the un-research project or a similar one as part of their instruction.
Contributor: Allison Hosier
Resource Type(s): Assignment Prompt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Students who write essays on research topics in which no outside sources are cited and accuracy is treated as negotiable generally should not expect to receive good grades, especially in an information literacy course. However, asking students to do just this was the first step in the “un-research project,” a twist on the familiar annotated bibliography assignment that was intended to guide students away from “satisficing” with their choice of sources and toward a better understanding of scholarship as a conversation. The project was implemented as part of a credit-bearing course in spring 2014 with promising results, including a more thoughtful choice of sources on students’ part. With some fine-tuning, the un-research project can offer an effective alternative to the traditional annotated bibliography assignment and can be adapted for a variety of instructional situations.
Contributor: Allison Hosier
Resource Type(s): Publication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationFramework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This chapter investigates the ACRL and WPA frameworks to discuss commonalities in how they approach appropriation of information in compositional contexts.  The chapter presents two sample assignments and outlines a case study of a collaboration between library and English faculty.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Resource Type(s): Assignment PromptPublication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationFramework as a Whole
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
The Citations lesson is mapped to Information has Value and Scholarship as Conversation Frames. It discusses why citations are a foundation of scholarly communication and the basic components of a citation. Through infographics and videos, students will learn the differences between paraphrasing, summarizing and quoting.
Contributor: Joelle Pitts
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has ValueScholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This assignment has students analyzing data presented in graphs, charts and infographics that are pre-selected by librarian and instructor based on how poorly the information is being presented through various outlets.
Contributor: Spencer Brayton
Resource Type(s): Activity
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The Scholarship is a Conversation lesson is mapped to the Scholarship as Conversation Frame and introduces the concept of scholarly conversations developing over time, and how to follow a scholarly conversation.
Contributor: Joelle Pitts
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This resource includes files and links for the conference paper and slides of the presentation Rhetorical Reinventions: Rethinking Research Processes and Information Practices to Deepen our Pedagogy, presented at LOEX 2016 by Donna Witek, Mary J. Snyder Broussard, and Joel M. Burkholder. Both the slides and the paper include a detailed bibliography of related resources.Presentation/Paper Abstract:The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy offers instruction librarians an opportunity to reconsider not only how they teach but also how they think about research and information. This new thinking has the potential to reinvent instructional practices, resulting in learning that is both situated and transferable. The discipline of rhetoric can inform this effort.This presentation will consider three traditional “steps” of the research process: question formulation, information search, and source evaluation. Traditional approaches over-simplify each activity: broaden the question by including related elements or narrow it by concentrating on a specific time/area/population; follow these steps to find the “correct” number and types of sources; and evaluate information based on the presence of external characteristics.Yet when information literacy is approached rhetorically, librarians can partner with classroom faculty to teach much more meaningful and transferable information literacy knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Librarians can then guide students in the complex processes of navigating the expectations of disciplinary audiences and developing a critical self-awareness of themselves as scholarly contributors; engaging with search tools, strategies, and processes in ways that are flexible, iterative, and exploratory by design; and comprehending more fully their information sources for deeper evaluation that better meets their own rhetorical goals. In an interactive presentation, the presenters will explore how rhetoric and composition theories have the potential—with creative and strategic thinking—to work in synergy with the Framework, make information literacy more authentic and meaningful, and develop true lifelong learners.
Contributor: Donna Witek
Type of Institution: Not Applicable
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Professor Jarvis C. McInnis, Ph.D., from the English & Africana Studies department met with me to discuss how we can get his students connected to information resources that demonstrated mastery of literary works, primary and secondary resources , critical works, and multi-media resources in order to formulate an annotated bibliography.  The following Library Research Guide was used in a library instruction session that focused on developing Boolean searching in order to find resources to create an annotated bibliography.
Contributor: Leslie L Morgan
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This lesson plan is designed to move students from a "Google experience" of information to the use of academic, peer-reviewed, and primary resources available within the Hesburgh Libraries. Dr. Kelly and I formulated a lesson that get at the heart of information literacy within the context of a Writing & Rhetoric course. The following writing assignment focuses on first year undergraduate students getting connected to information resources that will alow exploration of various points of view and themselves as contributors and consumers of information that contributes to the scholarly nature of rhetorical analysis.
Contributor: Leslie L Morgan
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Discipline(s): English
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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