Searching as Strategic Exploration

Graphic research handout that will help student understand how to conduct international business analysis. Print this handout into bookmark size: when printing PDF, choose page sizing & handling Multiple, page per sheet (Custom 2 by 1), page order  (horizontal reversed), print on both sides of the paper (flip on short edge), orientation (landscape).
Contributor: Grace Liu
Resource Type(s): Research Guide
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has ValueSearching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Business
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
Graphic research handout that will help student understand how to conduct SWOT analysis. Print this handout into bookmark size: when printing PDF, choose page sizing & handling Multiple, page per sheet (Custom 2 by 1), page order  (horizontal reversed), print on both sides of the paper (flip on short edge), orientation (landscape).
Contributor: Grace Liu
Resource Type(s): Research Guide
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has ValueSearching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Business
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversityOther
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
Graphic research handout that will help student understand how to conduct market analysis. Print this handout into bookmark size: when printing PDF, choose page sizing & handling Multiple, page per sheet (Custom 2 by 1), page order  (horizontal reversed), print on both sides of the paper (flip on short edge), orientation (landscape).
Contributor: Grace Liu
Resource Type(s): Research Guide
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has ValueSearching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Business
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
This is a lesson plan, files, and assessment information for an upper level biology class.  It is in two parts, finding genetic information online and citing images.  It follows a flipped model with pre-class activities required.  The second activity on citing images was created using a Process Orientated Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) framework.  Although this activity is specific to CSE style, the activity could be adapted to any citation style.  
Contributor: Michelle Price
Discipline(s): Biology
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
Discovery tools are great at revealing the variety of sources available to researchers. This one-shot lesson plan makes use of discovery platform facets and features to show students the range of content available. Students will also explore and evaluate how the available information sources differ from each other. The lesson may be more appropriate for upper-level students who have database experience and a basic understanding of what research looks like within their disciplines.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
The Search Strategies lesson is mapped to the Searching as Strategic Exploration Frame and introduces the concept of strategic searching in order to use search tools more effectively. By understanding strategic searching techniques, students will be able to not only compose an initial search query, but will be able to refine and revise their search in order to locate relevant sources. In this lesson students will learn how to:Identify keywords and search termsStrategically combine search terms using Boolean operators and punctuationEvaluate search results to apply useful search refinements
Contributor: Joelle Pitts
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
The Ask the Right Questions lesson is mapped to the Research as Inquiry and Searching as Strategic Exploration Frames and helps students learn how to determine the scope of their investigations by creating an appropriate research question. This lesson introduces the first step in a research process and criteria used to refine a topic into an appropriate research question. To accomplish this, the lesson will:Define a research question and the difference between a topic and a research questionIntroduce the 5W criteria for refining an investigationDiscuss how questions are too broad, too narrow, or just right within a given context/investigation
Contributor: Joelle Pitts
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as InquirySearching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
Rubric developed in collaboration with FYW faculty.
Contributor: Spencer Brayton
Resource Type(s): Rubric
Discipline(s): EnglishMultidisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This resource includes files and links for the conference paper and slides of the presentation Rhetorical Reinventions: Rethinking Research Processes and Information Practices to Deepen our Pedagogy, presented at LOEX 2016 by Donna Witek, Mary J. Snyder Broussard, and Joel M. Burkholder. Both the slides and the paper include a detailed bibliography of related resources.Presentation/Paper Abstract:The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy offers instruction librarians an opportunity to reconsider not only how they teach but also how they think about research and information. This new thinking has the potential to reinvent instructional practices, resulting in learning that is both situated and transferable. The discipline of rhetoric can inform this effort.This presentation will consider three traditional “steps” of the research process: question formulation, information search, and source evaluation. Traditional approaches over-simplify each activity: broaden the question by including related elements or narrow it by concentrating on a specific time/area/population; follow these steps to find the “correct” number and types of sources; and evaluate information based on the presence of external characteristics.Yet when information literacy is approached rhetorically, librarians can partner with classroom faculty to teach much more meaningful and transferable information literacy knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Librarians can then guide students in the complex processes of navigating the expectations of disciplinary audiences and developing a critical self-awareness of themselves as scholarly contributors; engaging with search tools, strategies, and processes in ways that are flexible, iterative, and exploratory by design; and comprehending more fully their information sources for deeper evaluation that better meets their own rhetorical goals. In an interactive presentation, the presenters will explore how rhetoric and composition theories have the potential—with creative and strategic thinking—to work in synergy with the Framework, make information literacy more authentic and meaningful, and develop true lifelong learners.
Contributor: Donna Witek
Type of Institution: Not Applicable
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Professor Jarvis C. McInnis, Ph.D., from the English & Africana Studies department met with me to discuss how we can get his students connected to information resources that demonstrated mastery of literary works, primary and secondary resources , critical works, and multi-media resources in order to formulate an annotated bibliography.  The following Library Research Guide was used in a library instruction session that focused on developing Boolean searching in order to find resources to create an annotated bibliography.
Contributor: Leslie L Morgan
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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