Searching as Strategic Exploration

As part of a collaboration with Claire Holmes and Lisa Sweeney at Towson University's Albert S. Cook Library, I infused our lesson plan for ISTC 301/501 with ACRL Framework Concepts. The original lesson plan was conceived of by Holmes and Sweeney as a way to integreate information literacy instruction concepts for teachers into ISTC 301 and SPED 413 in our College of Education. The attached slides illustrate one way to include information literacy instruction, the ACRL Framework, and teaching standards in college-level instruction. The aim for this lesson plan was to encourage College of Education students to include information literacy instruction in their lesson plans at the k-12 level so that students matriculating from their schools would be familiar with these crucial theories before arriving in higher education or the workplace.The lesson was structured as follows:Introduce digital citizenship and information literacy conceptsModel lesson planning using library resourcesCreate lesson plans using Common Core State StandardsStudents were encouraged to reflect on their own experiences as researchers, apply their learned research skills to their k-12 classrooms, use library resources to enhance their lesson plan creation, create a lesson plan in smaller groups to share with the classroom, incorporate lexile levels from multiple grade levels, and use open-source lesson plan materials focused on information literacy.Discussions about "Scholarship as a Conversation" and "Searching as Strategic Exploration" were included to highlight the importance of authority and of using sources from a variety of locations. 
Contributor: Sarah Gilchrist
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Discipline(s): Education
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This document lists the outcomes, performance indicators, and dispositions developed for the Threshold Achievement Test for Information Literacy (TATIL). This test has four modules inspired by the six frames of the Framework: Evaluating Process & Authority; Strategic Searching; Research & Scholarship; and The Value of Information. 
Contributor: Carolyn Radcliff
Resource Type(s): Learning Outcomes List
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This libguide will help students distinguoish between primary, secondary, and tertiary sources. It includes examples and links to other libraries that provide clear instruction on the matter.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Because most research tasks are complex, they require more than one search strategy. Additionally, such tasks require students to organize and synthesize the results of those searchers into one cohesive document.  This handout intends to introduce students to that process.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This handout informs students about the life cycle of information, directing them where to look based on when the even under research happened.  Additionally, a sample research plan is presented.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationSearching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This learning object is a visual rubric that students can use to evaluate materials they have found online including news, scholarly sources, and web content. It can be used as a handout or online image. A link to the Google Drawings version is also available if you'd like to remix this material with your own colors and branding or make edits. Choose File>Make a Copy to create your own editable version. This learning object is available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) license. 
Contributor: Laura Costello
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This exercise gives students a model for approaching a research task, beginning with general information and ending with more in-depth sources. Discussion can focus on research as inquiry, research as strategic exploration, and the context and construction of authority. Students are required to cite their sources using both MLA and APA.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Assignment Prompt
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
The three rubrics here were designed for an introductory course for English majors, but the ways in which the ACRL Framework is used could be replicated for any discipline and could be extended to program assessment.  Each rubric addresses one ARCL Frame.  The ACRL "dispositions" are treated as desired learning outcomes; the ACRL "knowledge practices" play the role of descriptors.  The rubric is intended to be used not simply on a student-produced project or activity, but on a project and a structured student reflection taken together.
Contributor: Terry Riley
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
I wrote "How Information Works:ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Lay Language" for a faculty workshop we held at Ohio University called, "Reimagining the Research Project."  Later, the Learner-Centered Teaching team took the "Actions" and/or "Attitudes" from that restatement and wrote rubrics for each frame. We chose just one Action or Attitude per frame to rubric-ize. These are still in draft form. Our intention here is to greatly simplify the language so faculty can more easily understand our purpose. I have linked to our page, where several versions can be accessed: simple (b/w), color handout, long version with attitudes and  actions from novice to expert, and draft rubrics.  
Contributor: sherri saines
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
For a performance task/ assignment, students will be expected to find evidence to investigate a pseudoscientific claim or conspiracy theory. They will be submitting a two-page paper to their Chemistry professor in which they make a case that either supports the claim or rejects it. They will be expected to use both library and credible online sources for support. The performance task will follow a full 75-minute library instruction session in which students will learn to:construct various search phrases for use in online and library search tools  use certain evaluation criteria (e.g. CRAAP) to assess the credibility of online sources  examine sources for relevance to their research question and search need (specifically, to determine credibility of claims)Throughout the class, an example claim will be used for searches. Either one of the following is recommended:Feng Shui – or the arrangement of furniture according to Chinese philosophy – can positively or negatively impact your wealth, health, happiness, and prosperity.President John F. Kennedy was not assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald – or his assassination is the result of a conspiracy of various entities and agents. Materials included:The full sequenced instruction outline for the face-to-face library instruction session. The assignment prompt for the performance task. CRAAP handout. 
Contributor: Cristy Moran
Resource Type(s): ActivityAssignment Prompt
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY

Pages