Information Has Value

The three rubrics here were designed for an introductory course for English majors, but the ways in which the ACRL Framework is used could be replicated for any discipline and could be extended to program assessment.  Each rubric addresses one ARCL Frame.  The ACRL "dispositions" are treated as desired learning outcomes; the ACRL "knowledge practices" play the role of descriptors.  The rubric is intended to be used not simply on a student-produced project or activity, but on a project and a structured student reflection taken together.
Contributor: Terry Riley
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This handout provides a crosswalk between the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education.  Librarians using this handout are prompted to describe their past instruction and service experiences that are related to each frame for the purposes of sparking ideas for programming and learning activities related to the Framework. The handout is designed to ease the transition from using the Standards to embracing the Framework in instruction and programming.  The FIU Information Litearcy Framework combines the Outcomes of the Standards with the Knowledge Practices of the Framework to provide assessable indicators of information literacy competencies in students.
Contributor: Ava Brillat
Resource Type(s): Instruction Program Material
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
I wrote "How Information Works:ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Lay Language" for a faculty workshop we held at Ohio University called, "Reimagining the Research Project."  Later, the Learner-Centered Teaching team took the "Actions" and/or "Attitudes" from that restatement and wrote rubrics for each frame. We chose just one Action or Attitude per frame to rubric-ize. These are still in draft form. Our intention here is to greatly simplify the language so faculty can more easily understand our purpose. I have linked to our page, where several versions can be accessed: simple (b/w), color handout, long version with attitudes and  actions from novice to expert, and draft rubrics.  
Contributor: sherri saines
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This hands-on activity was piloted as part of a teach-in on fake news at Purchase College, SUNY. To convey the idea that “fake news” exists on a continuum, we did a pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey activity using a blank version of Vanessa Otero’s "Media Bias" chart. The chart is a useful tool for showing the nuances between nonfactual, biased, and inflammatory news sources. Participants are asked to research a news media organization and decide where to place it on the chart, then compare their choices to Otero's original infographic. The ensuing discussion fits nicely with the ACRL Threshold Concept: “Authority is constructed and contextual” and can relate to "Research as Inquiry" or "Information as Value" as well, if economic factors related to the press and clickbait websites are discussed. The concept of a source being on a spectrum of “complex vs. clickbait” adds an additional layer of complexity for students who are used to focusing on binaries such as: liberal vs. conservative or “trustworthy vs. fake.” The details of how to implement this activity as well as copies of Otero's chart are attached.
Contributor: Darcy Gervasio
Discipline(s): InterdisciplinaryOther
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
The Inform Your Thinking video series introduces students to the frames of the ACRL Framework in an easy-to-understand manner by using conversational tone, approachable peer hosts, relatable comparisons, and eye-catching graphics. This video introduces students to the Information Has Value frame by illustrating the inherent value of information and its influence on information access. Students will explore the importance of investigating the source of their information, as well as recognizing the privilege of their access to information as students.
Contributor: Cristina Colquhoun
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This lesson plan from Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts, edited by Patricia Bravender, Hazel McClure, and Gayle Schaub and contributed by Debbie Morrow, concentrates on the value of information and the need to acknowledge that value through accurate attribution of sources, focusing not on print sources but on images and their use within the context of a presentation.
Resource Type(s): Lesson PlanPublication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Jenny Yap and Sonia Robles, helps introduce first-year English and ESL composition students to the differences between scholarly and popular sources.
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Nick Ferreira and Mackenzie Salisbury, is an exercise for students who understand the basic concepts of research in a college library, but need a quick refresher on college-level research and practical knowledge of their new library’s logistics.
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Jacalyn Bryan and Elana Karshmer, describes a three-part orientation activity designed to introduce new students to library resources and services.
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This one-shot lesson plan was designed for first-year community college students in a First Year Experience (FYE) course at Lone Star College-CyFair Library, a joint use academic and public library branch of the Harris County Public Library. The lesson plan introduces students to information resources available in print and online in an 80-minute tour and classroom session. Librarians also collaborated with FYE instructors to align the lesson plan’s activities with course outcomes and financial literacy topics covered on the FYE syllabus around the time the one-shots are scheduled. Students work in groups, complete a worksheet, present their work as a group, and reflect in a minute paper at the end of the session. 
Contributor: Jane Stimpson
Resource Type(s): ActivityLesson PlanWorksheet
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has ValueSearching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: Community or Junior College
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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