Information Creation as Process

Second of two library sessions provided to a introductory writing course. This is a scaffolded session focuses on visual literacy skills through the analysis of infographics and comics.
Contributor: Justina Elmore
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
First of two library sessions provided to a introductory writing course. This session focuses on conducting research.
Contributor: Justina Elmore
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as ProcessScholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
This lesson is intended as a single session within a major’s research methods course. Rather than using a shorter “scholarly vs. non-scholarly” comparison worksheet, this activity asks students to work in groups to systematically examine a scholarly article in depth, identify and evaluate its various components visually and in writing, and then compare it to a non-scholarly article on the same topic. Groups then report back to the entire class. Discussion is guided so as to touch on the processes by which sources are created, what these methods say about their authority, and to consider contextually appropriate uses for them. Although the activity was developed for students taking two social science majors' research methods courses (SOC 323 and ANTH 305), it could be adapted to any setting that lends itself to in-depth examination of information creation processes, the construction of authority, and the contextual appropriateness of sources.
Contributor: Krista Bowers Sharpe
Resource Type(s): ActivityLesson PlanWorksheet
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The three rubrics here were designed for an introductory course for English majors, but the ways in which the ACRL Framework is used could be replicated for any discipline and could be extended to program assessment.  Each rubric addresses one ARCL Frame.  The ACRL "dispositions" are treated as desired learning outcomes; the ACRL "knowledge practices" play the role of descriptors.  The rubric is intended to be used not simply on a student-produced project or activity, but on a project and a structured student reflection taken together.
Contributor: Terry Riley
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This handout provides a crosswalk between the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education.  Librarians using this handout are prompted to describe their past instruction and service experiences that are related to each frame for the purposes of sparking ideas for programming and learning activities related to the Framework. The handout is designed to ease the transition from using the Standards to embracing the Framework in instruction and programming.  The FIU Information Litearcy Framework combines the Outcomes of the Standards with the Knowledge Practices of the Framework to provide assessable indicators of information literacy competencies in students.
Contributor: Ava Brillat
Resource Type(s): Instruction Program Material
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
I wrote "How Information Works:ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Lay Language" for a faculty workshop we held at Ohio University called, "Reimagining the Research Project."  Later, the Learner-Centered Teaching team took the "Actions" and/or "Attitudes" from that restatement and wrote rubrics for each frame. We chose just one Action or Attitude per frame to rubric-ize. These are still in draft form. Our intention here is to greatly simplify the language so faculty can more easily understand our purpose. I have linked to our page, where several versions can be accessed: simple (b/w), color handout, long version with attitudes and  actions from novice to expert, and draft rubrics.  
Contributor: sherri saines
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Students will be exposed to various entry points of a sustainability topic in various formats.This lesson is to serve as an introduction to different types of sources that can be used to learn about and research topics - including multimedia sources, Internet, and scholarly articles - and the attributes of different kinds of sources. They will take notes as they hear/read the sources using Elements of Thought (based on Paul-Elder's critical thinking model) and reflect in small groups to evaluate the credibility of the sources and what next steps they will take to further research. This is a face-to-face, in-class activity. The duration of the in-class activities for this lesson is approximately 60-75 minutes. Length and difficulty of content should be considered when selecting the examples.It is highly adaptable for content and theme although it was designed, originally, for a faculty member whose first-year composition class is themed around sustainability. Instructor will select various source types to explore a single topic. Possible sustainability-themed examples include: food deserts, clean water in the US, bee colony collapse, etc.Source types should include:One short-form video product (I.e. TED Talk, video essay, documentary clip, recorded speech, or other topical video informational product)One published essay, opinion editorial, or commentaryOne informative (unbiased) article or reference entry.
Contributor: Cristy Moran
Resource Type(s): Activity
Discipline(s): InterdisciplinaryOther
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
The Inform Your Thinking video series introduces students to the frames of the ACRL Framework in an easy-to-understand manner by using conversational tone, approachable peer hosts, relatable comparisons, and eye-catching graphics. This video introduces students to the Information Creation as a Process frame by examining how the process for creating information impacts the way information is shared and packaged. Students will decide when to use each type of information depending on creation process, as well as recognize the need to verify their sources. 
Contributor: Cristina Colquhoun
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This lesson plan from Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts, edited by Patricia Bravender, Hazel McClure, and Gayle Schaub and contributed by Toni M. Carter and Todd Aldridge, engages students with content in a way that compels them to consider the format of information each time they consider using it in their work.
Resource Type(s): Lesson PlanPublication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Joy Oehlers, demonstrates a fun group activity that uses a familiar tool for ESOL students to make sense of their library collections and basic services.
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY

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