Information Creation as Process

This document lists the outcomes, performance indicators, and dispositions developed for the Threshold Achievement Test for Information Literacy (TATIL). This test has four modules inspired by the six frames of the Framework: Evaluating Process & Authority; Strategic Searching; Research & Scholarship; and The Value of Information. 
Contributor: Carolyn Radcliff
Resource Type(s): Learning Outcomes List
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
A guide to helping student know how to use (or not to use!) the different kinds of information they may find.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as ProcessScholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
This resource introduces students to rubrics for evaluating information, including SCARAB, CRAAP, and Reuters Source Guide. Furthermore, it provides a framework of questions to ask about a piece of information under consideration. 
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This example of an article summary, as one might find in a literature review of annotated bibliography,  enumerates the steps to ethically and accurately complete a typical research task.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as ProcessScholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Because most research tasks are complex, they require more than one search strategy. Additionally, such tasks require students to organize and synthesize the results of those searchers into one cohesive document.  This handout intends to introduce students to that process.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This reading provides a broad overview of the topic of "fake news" and discusses the inherent difficulty of "fixing" the problem.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
Second of two library sessions provided to a introductory writing course. This is a scaffolded session focuses on visual literacy skills through the analysis of infographics and comics.
Contributor: Justina Elmore
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
First of two library sessions provided to a introductory writing course. This session focuses on conducting research.
Contributor: Justina Elmore
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as ProcessScholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
This lesson is intended as a single session within a major’s research methods course. Rather than using a shorter “scholarly vs. non-scholarly” comparison worksheet, this activity asks students to work in groups to systematically examine a scholarly article in depth, identify and evaluate its various components visually and in writing, and then compare it to a non-scholarly article on the same topic. Groups then report back to the entire class. Discussion is guided so as to touch on the processes by which sources are created, what these methods say about their authority, and to consider contextually appropriate uses for them. Although the activity was developed for students taking two social science majors' research methods courses (SOC 323 and ANTH 305), it could be adapted to any setting that lends itself to in-depth examination of information creation processes, the construction of authority, and the contextual appropriateness of sources.
Contributor: Krista Bowers Sharpe
Resource Type(s): ActivityLesson PlanWorksheet
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The three rubrics here were designed for an introductory course for English majors, but the ways in which the ACRL Framework is used could be replicated for any discipline and could be extended to program assessment.  Each rubric addresses one ARCL Frame.  The ACRL "dispositions" are treated as desired learning outcomes; the ACRL "knowledge practices" play the role of descriptors.  The rubric is intended to be used not simply on a student-produced project or activity, but on a project and a structured student reflection taken together.
Contributor: Terry Riley
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved

Pages