Framework as a Whole

This matrix was developed as a result of conversations with the writing department faculty, FYS coordinator, and general education committee.  I condensed the language of the Framework as well as the learner/dispositions, and led the workshop with faculty and librarians on how to begin to look at their specific courses as well as across the program on how they might incorporate the FW at each level, for each course, and drill down to the classroom instruction, partnering with the librarian on activities, assessment, and outcomes. More work and a journal publication about this process and method TBD. Please contact me (rhondahuisman@gmail.com) or PM on Twitter if you have questions, discussion, etc.Pilot exercise presented at Marian University Faculty Con (May, 2017)
Contributor: Rhonda Huisman
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
Based on ACRL Framework, AAC&U Rubric for Information Literacy, and AAC&U Rubric for Inquiry and Analysis.
Contributor: Rachel Sanders
Resource Type(s): Rubric
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
Type of Institution: College
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
I wrote "How Information Works:ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Lay Language" for a faculty workshop we held at Ohio University called, "Reimagining the Research Assignment."  Later, the Learner-Centered Teaching team took the "Actions" and/or "Attitudes" from that restatement and wrote "Gateway Scales:" almost-rubrics for each frame.  Our intention here is to greatly simplify the language so faculty can more easily understand our purpose. I have linked to our page, where several versions can be accessed: simple (b/w), color handout, long color version with attitudes and actions from novice to expert.  I have also uploaded PDFs of both documents.
Contributor: sherri saines
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This LibGuide is the result of our Reference Team's year-long project to create a new curriculum for our Instruction program, based on the Framework. Our project plan and documentation of our workflow is also available by request.MacPhaidin Library’s information skills curriculum is designed to teach students increasingly sophisticated research strategies throughout their Stonehill careers and to produce graduates who are adept at articulating their information needs, finding the resources to meet them, and using that data ethically to create new knowledge.By the time they graduate, students who participate in the full information skills curriculum can:Define their information needIdentify appropriate source types and research tools to meet their information needEvaluate information to determine its validity, accuracy, authority, timeliness and biasSynthesize information from research with existing understanding in order to create new knowledgeIdentify the legal, ethical, economic and social issues related to the use of information and recognize relevant intellectual property lawsUsing the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education, we’ve created a curriculum that identifies specific learning goals for the different stages of students’ studies. The stages focus on a variety of core concepts ranging from the simple – the iterative nature of searching - to the more complex – the impact of context on the value of information. The framework is designed to enhance student's information skills through faculty-librarian collaboration. This curriculum provides a template faculty and librarians can use to collaboratively craft instruction that will improve students’ information skills and, thereby, result in better work. This guide introduces our mission statement, curriculum and learning outcomes, and provides examples of the many ways librarians can assist you as your students develop their skills.
Contributor: Elizabeth Chase
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: College
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in College and Undergraduate Libraries on November 18, 2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10691316.2017.1246396  Abstract: Threshold concepts theory and learning outcomes represent two different ways of thinking about teaching and learning. Finding a way to translate between the two is necessary for librarians who may wish to use concepts from the Framework for Information Literacy to shape their instruction. The following article outlines a process for transforming concepts from the “Scholarship as Conversation” frame into learning outcomes that the author developed as part of a tutorial project. This process can easily be adapted to a variety of instructional situations.
Contributor: Allison Hosier
Resource Type(s): Publication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationFramework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This chapter from Classroom Assessment Techniques for Librarians, by Melissa Bowles-Terry and Cassandra Kvenild, uses three assessment techniques to help librarians assess students’ skill in synthesis and creative thinking. 
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This chapter from the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook, edited by Nicole Pagowsky and Kelly McElroy and written by Rachel Gammons, demonstrates a critical assessment activity that offers an opportunity to reflect on the lived reality of learners and make purposeful and informed adjustments to teaching.
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This chapter from Rewired: Research-Writing Partnerships within the Frameworks focuses on the formalized and explicit instructor-librarian collaboration in a specialized section of technical writing, and how that partnership initiated curricular and pedagogical changes that brought the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and The Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing to the forefront of course design.
Resource Type(s): Publication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Kyrille Goldbeck DeBose, is a set of lesson plans originally designed for a First-Year Experience (FYE) course taught to familiarize students with several concepts across the Framework and create a foundational knowledge base to be built upon throughout their academic careers.
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This resource is an online guide to developing and assessing student learning outcomes based on the Framework.  The guide includes:A document mapping the Standards to the Framework.A brief discussion of assessment.An introduction to each frame.Sample outcomes for multiple choice questions, with example questions.Sample outcomes for short assignments, with examples of potential assignments.Sample outcomes for research assignments, with sample rubrics.A select annotated bibliography.
Contributor: Rachel McMullin
Resource Type(s): Assessment Material
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Tags: Assessment
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY

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