Framework as a Whole

This link was an experiment joining a small seminar-style class (LIBR201) with a large lecture class (A/HI271). Ten students registered for both courses. During a Writing Instruction Support retreat that both faculty attended in August 2013, they developed the linked aspect of the course by working through the overarching pedagogical theory driving this particular retreat, the idea of the “threshold concept,” which Dr. Carmen Werder has described as a “discipline-based concept that provides a transformational understanding and entrance to that discipline.” The instructors developed a threshold concept that helped to bind their courses together: “Data are not only textual but also visual and oral; there are data beyond texts.” This concept became the organizing principle for how the Link would function.
Contributor: Sylvia Tag
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as InquiryFramework as a Whole
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
A rubric which may be used to assess literacies based on the concepts in the ACRL Framework
Contributor: Shehaamah Mohamed
Resource Type(s): Assessment Material
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
The University of the Western Cape has developed a set of graduate attributes that are based on the UWC vision and mission. This tutorial is based on six concepts that may be used to enhance such attributes. An understanding of these concepts will mean that students develop a sense of agency in their research and practices, which opens up a pathway to lifelong learning and professional development. The concepts enable learners to become autonomous and collaborative and active contributors to knowledge. The tutorial also offers authentic examples which may be used to illustrate ways of applying and interpreting the various concepts.
Contributor: Shehaamah Mohamed
Resource Type(s): Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Education
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This chapter investigates the ACRL and WPA frameworks to discuss commonalities in how they approach appropriation of information in compositional contexts.  The chapter presents two sample assignments and outlines a case study of a collaboration between library and English faculty.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Resource Type(s): Assignment PromptPublication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationFramework as a Whole
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
Exploratory study in two parts.  Part one addresses the question of whether or not undergraduate students can understand the language and concepts in this document. By presenting student responses to pretest questions recorded at the beginning of a semester-long research methods course, this article shows that students can, even on first impression, begin to make sense of the complexity and richness found in the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.  Survey questions and complete student responses are included.Part two compares student pretest and posttest responses conducted at the beginning and end of a semester-long research methods course to measure the evolution of undergraduate students’ comprehension of information literacy concepts aspresented in the Frames.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
Scope: Course-level
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
College & Research Libraries News article about using the Framework to make sense of local curricula as they relate to information literacy goals and outcomes. Also discusses the Framework in light of "developmental outcomes," i.e., outcomes that are sequenced within a curriculum. 
Contributor: Donna Witek
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Information Fallout is a narrative-based learning tool designed to introduce information literacy skills to students. It is based around attaining and using six “Info Tactics” that align to the six Framework concepts. Information Fallout is meant to introduce these information literacy concepts to students. Librarians and other educators should pair the game with further discussion or lessons or assignments to more fully articulate the details of the framework skills.The site's About page lists learning objectives and includes lesson plan ideas to incorporate the game into instruction.
Contributor: Matt Lee
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This lesson plan template incorporates the ACRL Framework into the lesson planning workflow. Librarians identify which frame(s) the class will be covering prior to the creation of learning outcomes and activities. Assessment and reflection pieces are also included.
Contributor: Karleigh Knorr
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
"Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, shares her views about the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. She believes that that the Framework is one among many documents adopted by the Association of College and Research Libraries that academic librarians can and should use to promote information literacy. This interview was conducted in May 2016."
Contributor: Lisa Hinchliffe
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This resource includes files and links for the conference paper and slides of the presentation Rhetorical Reinventions: Rethinking Research Processes and Information Practices to Deepen our Pedagogy, presented at LOEX 2016 by Donna Witek, Mary J. Snyder Broussard, and Joel M. Burkholder. Both the slides and the paper include a detailed bibliography of related resources.Presentation/Paper Abstract:The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy offers instruction librarians an opportunity to reconsider not only how they teach but also how they think about research and information. This new thinking has the potential to reinvent instructional practices, resulting in learning that is both situated and transferable. The discipline of rhetoric can inform this effort.This presentation will consider three traditional “steps” of the research process: question formulation, information search, and source evaluation. Traditional approaches over-simplify each activity: broaden the question by including related elements or narrow it by concentrating on a specific time/area/population; follow these steps to find the “correct” number and types of sources; and evaluate information based on the presence of external characteristics.Yet when information literacy is approached rhetorically, librarians can partner with classroom faculty to teach much more meaningful and transferable information literacy knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Librarians can then guide students in the complex processes of navigating the expectations of disciplinary audiences and developing a critical self-awareness of themselves as scholarly contributors; engaging with search tools, strategies, and processes in ways that are flexible, iterative, and exploratory by design; and comprehending more fully their information sources for deeper evaluation that better meets their own rhetorical goals. In an interactive presentation, the presenters will explore how rhetoric and composition theories have the potential—with creative and strategic thinking—to work in synergy with the Framework, make information literacy more authentic and meaningful, and develop true lifelong learners.
Contributor: Donna Witek
Type of Institution: Not Applicable
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

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