Authority is Constructed and Contextual

This is an activity we use in our Freshman-level writing class information literacy instruction one-shots. The activity presents four online resources and asks students to use the "Evaluating Online Sources" rubric to evaluate their assigned resource. Students vote using an online form on whether they would use a resource in their paper and then the instructor discusses each resource in depth with input from the group that evaluated it. Instructor will ask students to describe their resource and answer the questions asked by the rubric and then discuss the suitability of the resource. Exercise takes ~20 minutes.
Contributor: Laura Costello
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This resource introduces students to rubrics for evaluating information, including SCARAB, CRAAP, and Reuters Source Guide. Furthermore, it provides a framework of questions to ask about a piece of information under consideration. 
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This exercise asks students to respond to two videos, sharing with their classmates what feelings and ideas the images and music evoke in them.  The first video is an ExxonMobil commercial and the other is a humorous critique of advertising stock footage.  Be warned that the critique does contain one mild swear word.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and ContextualInformation Has Value
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This libguide will help students distinguoish between primary, secondary, and tertiary sources. It includes examples and links to other libraries that provide clear instruction on the matter.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This learning object is a visual rubric that students can use to evaluate materials they have found online including news, scholarly sources, and web content. It can be used as a handout or online image. A link to the Google Drawings version is also available if you'd like to remix this material with your own colors and branding or make edits. Choose File>Make a Copy to create your own editable version. This learning object is available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) license. 
Contributor: Laura Costello
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This reading provides a broad overview of the topic of "fake news" and discusses the inherent difficulty of "fixing" the problem.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This handout lists different ways that information may be incorrectly or unethically presented to audiences and offers suggestions for correctly using information.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
This exercise gives students a model for approaching a research task, beginning with general information and ending with more in-depth sources. Discussion can focus on research as inquiry, research as strategic exploration, and the context and construction of authority. Students are required to cite their sources using both MLA and APA.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Assignment Prompt
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
This lesson is intended as a single session within a major’s research methods course. Rather than using a shorter “scholarly vs. non-scholarly” comparison worksheet, this activity asks students to work in groups to systematically examine a scholarly article in depth, identify and evaluate its various components visually and in writing, and then compare it to a non-scholarly article on the same topic. Groups then report back to the entire class. Discussion is guided so as to touch on the processes by which sources are created, what these methods say about their authority, and to consider contextually appropriate uses for them. Although the activity was developed for students taking two social science majors' research methods courses (SOC 323 and ANTH 305), it could be adapted to any setting that lends itself to in-depth examination of information creation processes, the construction of authority, and the contextual appropriateness of sources.
Contributor: Krista Bowers Sharpe
Resource Type(s): ActivityLesson PlanWorksheet
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This handout provides a crosswalk between the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education.  Librarians using this handout are prompted to describe their past instruction and service experiences that are related to each frame for the purposes of sparking ideas for programming and learning activities related to the Framework. The handout is designed to ease the transition from using the Standards to embracing the Framework in instruction and programming.  The FIU Information Litearcy Framework combines the Outcomes of the Standards with the Knowledge Practices of the Framework to provide assessable indicators of information literacy competencies in students.
Contributor: Ava Brillat
Resource Type(s): Instruction Program Material
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved

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