Rhetoric, Composition, and Writing

This chart is the result of a partnership between campus Writing Coordinator,  First Year Seminar Coordinator, and myself (Information Literacy Coordinator) to create a customizable assignment structure for our first year seminar class. It offers a template for integrating information literacy into the course and links threshold concepts of writing composition to the Framework. Composition threshold concepts are those outlined by Kassner and Wardle (2015) Naming What We Know: Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies.
Contributor: Jennifer Hasse
Resource Type(s): Instruction Program Material
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This chapter from Classroom Assessment Techniques for Librarians, by Melissa Bowles-Terry and Cassandra Kvenild, uses three assessment techniques to help librarians assess students’ skill in synthesis and creative thinking. 
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This chapter from the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook, edited by Nicole Pagowsky and Kelly McElroy and written by Rachel Gammons, demonstrates a critical assessment activity that offers an opportunity to reflect on the lived reality of learners and make purposeful and informed adjustments to teaching.
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This chapter from Rewired: Research-Writing Partnerships within the Frameworks focuses on the formalized and explicit instructor-librarian collaboration in a specialized section of technical writing, and how that partnership initiated curricular and pedagogical changes that brought the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and The Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing to the forefront of course design.
Resource Type(s): Publication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Jenny Yap and Sonia Robles, helps introduce first-year English and ESL composition students to the differences between scholarly and popular sources.
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This chapter investigates the ACRL and WPA frameworks to discuss commonalities in how they approach appropriation of information in compositional contexts.  The chapter presents two sample assignments and outlines a case study of a collaboration between library and English faculty.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Resource Type(s): Assignment PromptPublication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationFramework as a Whole
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This resource includes files and links for the conference paper and slides of the presentation Rhetorical Reinventions: Rethinking Research Processes and Information Practices to Deepen our Pedagogy, presented at LOEX 2016 by Donna Witek, Mary J. Snyder Broussard, and Joel M. Burkholder. Both the slides and the paper include a detailed bibliography of related resources.Presentation/Paper Abstract:The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy offers instruction librarians an opportunity to reconsider not only how they teach but also how they think about research and information. This new thinking has the potential to reinvent instructional practices, resulting in learning that is both situated and transferable. The discipline of rhetoric can inform this effort.This presentation will consider three traditional “steps” of the research process: question formulation, information search, and source evaluation. Traditional approaches over-simplify each activity: broaden the question by including related elements or narrow it by concentrating on a specific time/area/population; follow these steps to find the “correct” number and types of sources; and evaluate information based on the presence of external characteristics.Yet when information literacy is approached rhetorically, librarians can partner with classroom faculty to teach much more meaningful and transferable information literacy knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Librarians can then guide students in the complex processes of navigating the expectations of disciplinary audiences and developing a critical self-awareness of themselves as scholarly contributors; engaging with search tools, strategies, and processes in ways that are flexible, iterative, and exploratory by design; and comprehending more fully their information sources for deeper evaluation that better meets their own rhetorical goals. In an interactive presentation, the presenters will explore how rhetoric and composition theories have the potential—with creative and strategic thinking—to work in synergy with the Framework, make information literacy more authentic and meaningful, and develop true lifelong learners.
Contributor: Donna Witek
Type of Institution: Not Applicable
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
The Hip Hop LibGuide is a scholarly comprehensive online resource about Hip Hop Information Literacy and the artform in general. The libguide has been developed to engage novice, intermediate, and skilled learners that are interested in learning more about the culture, social issues, and artistic components of Hip Hop.
Contributor: kYmberly Keeton
Resource Type(s): Research Guide
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The Hip Information Literacy Curriculum is a blueprint created to help facilitate a collaborative partnership between faculty and students, by providing the necessary research tools and knowledge practices for a scholarly academic writing career and environment.  
Contributor: kYmberly Keeton
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved

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