Library and Information Science

This document includes SLOs with performance indicators. After each indicator is a rubric to explain what would be considered excellent, acceptable, developing, or confused work for each indicator. It can be used for a course or program.
Contributor: Smita Avasthi
Resource Type(s): Learning Outcomes ListRubric
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Type of Institution: Community or Junior College
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This rubric is based upon a set of learning outcomes for an information literacy course. Each outcome includes specific performance indicators. The rubric has 4 categories for evaluation: excellent, acceptable, developing, and confused. This rubric could also be used on the program level.
Contributor: Smita Avasthi
Resource Type(s): Rubric
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Type of Institution: Community or Junior College
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This is a map to the current course outline for a 1-unit information literacy class to a proposed course outline that embeds all of the frames.
Contributor: Smita Avasthi
Resource Type(s): Curriculum Map
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Tags: SLOs
Type of Institution: Community or Junior College
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This is a draft of the revised course outline for a one-unit information literacy course. Due to our curriculum process, it includes broad outcomes followed by more specific performance indicators. There is also the "Topics and Scope" which specifies content more explicitly. It could also be used at the program level.
Contributor: Smita Avasthi
Resource Type(s): Learning Outcomes List
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Tags: SLOs
Type of Institution: Community or Junior College
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
Four short screencasts under 90 seconds about the role of metacognition in information literacy instruction.
Contributor: Susan Ariew
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as Inquiry
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
In the early drafts of the Information Literacy Framework for Higher Education, metaliteracy and metacognition contributed several guiding principles in recognition of the fact that information literacy concepts need to reflect students’ roles as creators and participants in research and scholarship. The authors contend that diminution of metaliteracy and metacognition occurred during later revisions of the Framework and thus diminished the document’s usefulness as a teaching tool. This article highlights the value of metaliteracy and metacognition in order to support the argument that these concepts are critical to information literacy today, and that the language of these concepts should be revisited in the language of the Framework. Certainly metacognition and metaliteracy should be included in pedagogical strategies submitted to the newly launched ACRL Framework for Information Literacy Sandbox.
Contributor: Susan Ariew
Resource Type(s): Publication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The three rubrics here were designed for an introductory course for English majors, but the ways in which the ACRL Framework is used could be replicated for any discipline and could be extended to program assessment.  Each rubric addresses one ARCL Frame.  The ACRL "dispositions" are treated as desired learning outcomes; the ACRL "knowledge practices" play the role of descriptors.  The rubric is intended to be used not simply on a student-produced project or activity, but on a project and a structured student reflection taken together.
Contributor: Terry Riley
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This link was an experiment joining a small seminar-style class (LIBR201) with a large lecture class (A/HI271). Ten students registered for both courses. During a Writing Instruction Support retreat that both faculty attended in August 2013, they developed the linked aspect of the course by working through the overarching pedagogical theory driving this particular retreat, the idea of the “threshold concept,” which Dr. Carmen Werder has described as a “discipline-based concept that provides a transformational understanding and entrance to that discipline.” The instructors developed a threshold concept that helped to bind their courses together: “Data are not only textual but also visual and oral; there are data beyond texts.” This concept became the organizing principle for how the Link would function.
Contributor: Sylvia Tag
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as InquiryFramework as a Whole
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
Discovery tools are great at revealing the variety of sources available to researchers. This one-shot lesson plan makes use of discovery platform facets and features to show students the range of content available. Students will also explore and evaluate how the available information sources differ from each other. The lesson may be more appropriate for upper-level students who have database experience and a basic understanding of what research looks like within their disciplines.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This chapter investigates the ACRL and WPA frameworks to discuss commonalities in how they approach appropriation of information in compositional contexts.  The chapter presents two sample assignments and outlines a case study of a collaboration between library and English faculty.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Resource Type(s): Assignment PromptPublication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationFramework as a Whole
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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