Library and Information Science

This lesson is designed to orient teacher education students to the library spaces and resources that support the development of multiple literacies by using a gamified tour through a series of stations throughout the library. Exploration stations are focused on themes of Indigenous perspectives and critical literacy, differentiated reading materials, leisure reading, coding and computational thinking resources, and “making” stories through unplugged STEAM activities. At each station, students engage with the resources through conversation, play, and decision-making. Students will gain an appreciation for the breadth of library resources to support the development of multiple literacies, and begin to critically appraise teaching and learning resources for the classroom. The Unlock Library Literacy workshop models a gamified approach to learning design. Students gather in small groups and engage in a self-guided exploration of stations throughout the library, with librarians available to facilitate and answer questions. An online survey platform is used to randomly move students from one station to the next, and states the tasks students must perform at each location. After completing each exploration station, students will receive a clue. After completing all required stations, students will have the code for a combination lock that they can use to unlock a box and get a prize.  
Contributor: Wendy Traas
Resource Type(s): ActivityLesson Plan
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
If there were a list of things I absolutely required all my students to understand before leaving my class, the relationship between mass media, politics, and science would be close to the top of the list. But there are a lot of moving parts in these relationships, so the terrain is difficult to traverse.  As one might expect of a difficult topic, there is much to read and a lot to unpack.   This pathfinder discusses how politics and our mass media system complicate the dissemination of important scientific information. 
Contributor: Todd Heldt
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
The Critical Information Literacy Lesson Plan includes a lesson plan with a bibliography of assigned readings and discussion questions for students as well as presentation slides with main points from the lesson: definition of critical information literacy, evaluating information is a process, authority is constructed and contextual, how to evaluate information, and check the facts.
Contributor: Latia Ward
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
Studying music in an online setting requires that students and instructors leverage digital resources and participatory technologies with understanding and intentionality. Meta-literacy, a framework promoting critical thinking and collaboration, is an inclusive approach to understanding the complexities of information use, production, and sharing in a digital environment. This chapter explores the implications of meta-literacy for the online music classroom and identifies ways in which the librarian and music instructor can collaborate to promote student self-reflection on the use, creation, and understanding of musical information or content.  
Contributor: Rachel Scott
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This rubric was designed for use with a Freshmen-level information literacy instruction one-shot. The faculty member required that students select one empirical research article to support their research paper for the course. The information literacy session specifically went over crafting research questions, understanding emprical research, bias, study design, etc. Students were shown how to search for quantitative and qualtiative research and to recognize identifiers of empirical research using an article's abstract. Once the assignment was completed the course instructor shared the students' selected articles and their justification for why it was appropraite with the librarian who taught the course. 
Contributor: Claudia McGivney
Resource Type(s): Rubric
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This rubric was created to evaluate student resource choice for their research papers after a library session. The rubric keeps the scope of ACRL's Framework in mind, while focusing on evalautive criteria students' would be taught to implement in their research inquiries during an information literacy session. The rubric consists of four categories: begining, emerging, developing and proficient, which allow for clear delineations of students' sophistication in conducting research.   
Contributor: Claudia McGivney
Resource Type(s): Rubric
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as InquirySearching as Strategic Exploration
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
A discussion and overview of the following ideasWhy we see things differently.Why we don’t like to be wrong.Why it is dangerous to question authority.Where we got the letter A.The morbidity of Puritan children’s books.How culture and community impact information.The origin of the political parties in America.How information is dangerous and can be used to disrupt or preserve a social order. take note of the following terms:cognitive dissonanceconfirmation biasdisconfirmation biasoppositional media hostilitypropagandatop-down information systemsbottom-up information systemspublic spheresocial responsibility theory of journalismobjectivitythe Fairness DoctrineNet Neutrality 
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLesson Plan
Scope: Course-level
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This document includes SLOs with performance indicators. After each indicator is a rubric to explain what would be considered excellent, acceptable, developing, or confused work for each indicator. It can be used for a course or program.
Contributor: Smita Avasthi
Resource Type(s): Learning Outcomes ListRubric
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Type of Institution: Community or Junior College
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This rubric is based upon a set of learning outcomes for an information literacy course. Each outcome includes specific performance indicators. The rubric has 4 categories for evaluation: excellent, acceptable, developing, and confused. This rubric could also be used on the program level.
Contributor: Smita Avasthi
Resource Type(s): Rubric
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Type of Institution: Community or Junior College
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This is a map to the current course outline for a 1-unit information literacy class to a proposed course outline that embeds all of the frames.
Contributor: Smita Avasthi
Resource Type(s): Curriculum Map
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Tags: SLOs
Type of Institution: Community or Junior College
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved

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