Interdisciplinary

This resource introduces students to rubrics for evaluating information, including SCARAB, CRAAP, and Reuters Source Guide. Furthermore, it provides a framework of questions to ask about a piece of information under consideration. 
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This handout informs students about the life cycle of information, directing them where to look based on when the even under research happened.  Additionally, a sample research plan is presented.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationSearching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This reading provides a broad overview of the topic of "fake news" and discusses the inherent difficulty of "fixing" the problem.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This handout lists different ways that information may be incorrectly or unethically presented to audiences and offers suggestions for correctly using information.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
This handout provides a crosswalk between the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education.  Librarians using this handout are prompted to describe their past instruction and service experiences that are related to each frame for the purposes of sparking ideas for programming and learning activities related to the Framework. The handout is designed to ease the transition from using the Standards to embracing the Framework in instruction and programming.  The FIU Information Litearcy Framework combines the Outcomes of the Standards with the Knowledge Practices of the Framework to provide assessable indicators of information literacy competencies in students.
Contributor: Ava Brillat
Resource Type(s): Instruction Program Material
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
Based on ACRL Framework, AAC&U Rubric for Information Literacy, and AAC&U Rubric for Inquiry and Analysis.
Contributor: Rachel Sanders
Resource Type(s): Rubric
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
Type of Institution: College
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
For a performance task/ assignment, students will be expected to find evidence to investigate a pseudoscientific claim or conspiracy theory. They will be submitting a two-page paper to their Chemistry professor in which they make a case that either supports the claim or rejects it. They will be expected to use both library and credible online sources for support. The performance task will follow a full 75-minute library instruction session in which students will learn to:construct various search phrases for use in online and library search tools  use certain evaluation criteria (e.g. CRAAP) to assess the credibility of online sources  examine sources for relevance to their research question and search need (specifically, to determine credibility of claims)Throughout the class, an example claim will be used for searches. Either one of the following is recommended:Feng Shui – or the arrangement of furniture according to Chinese philosophy – can positively or negatively impact your wealth, health, happiness, and prosperity.President John F. Kennedy was not assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald – or his assassination is the result of a conspiracy of various entities and agents. Materials included:The full sequenced instruction outline for the face-to-face library instruction session. The assignment prompt for the performance task. CRAAP handout. 
Contributor: Cristy Moran
Resource Type(s): ActivityAssignment Prompt
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
Students will be exposed to various entry points of a sustainability topic in various formats.This lesson is to serve as an introduction to different types of sources that can be used to learn about and research topics - including multimedia sources, Internet, and scholarly articles - and the attributes of different kinds of sources. They will take notes as they hear/read the sources using Elements of Thought (based on Paul-Elder's critical thinking model) and reflect in small groups to evaluate the credibility of the sources and what next steps they will take to further research. This is a face-to-face, in-class activity. The duration of the in-class activities for this lesson is approximately 60-75 minutes. Length and difficulty of content should be considered when selecting the examples.It is highly adaptable for content and theme although it was designed, originally, for a faculty member whose first-year composition class is themed around sustainability. Instructor will select various source types to explore a single topic. Possible sustainability-themed examples include: food deserts, clean water in the US, bee colony collapse, etc.Source types should include:One short-form video product (I.e. TED Talk, video essay, documentary clip, recorded speech, or other topical video informational product)One published essay, opinion editorial, or commentaryOne informative (unbiased) article or reference entry.
Contributor: Cristy Moran
Resource Type(s): Activity
Discipline(s): InterdisciplinaryOther
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This hands-on activity was piloted as part of a teach-in on fake news at Purchase College, SUNY. To convey the idea that “fake news” exists on a continuum, we did a pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey activity using a blank version of Vanessa Otero’s Media Bias chart. The chart is a useful tool for showing the nuances between nonfactual, biased, and inflammatory news sources. Participants are asked to research a news media organization and decide where to place it on the chart, then compare their choices to Otero's original infographic. Two groups can also compare their choices to each other. The ensuing discussion fits nicely with the ACRL Threshold Concept: “Authority is constructed and contextual” and can relate to "Research as Inquiry" or "Information as Value" as well, if economic factors related to the press and clickbait websites are discussed. The concept of a source being on a spectrum of “complex vs. clickbait” adds an additional layer of complexity for students who are used to focusing on binaries such as: liberal vs. conservative or “trustworthy vs. fake.” The details of how to implement this activity as well as copies of Otero's chart are attached. (P.S. An updated version of the chart was created in Fall 2017 adding more nuance along the "complexity" axis and removing some of the "PG-13" or "sassy" language. See attached PDFs).
Contributor: Darcy Gervasio
Discipline(s): InterdisciplinaryOther
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This chapter from Rewired: Research-Writing Partnerships within the Frameworks focuses on the formalized and explicit instructor-librarian collaboration in a specialized section of technical writing, and how that partnership initiated curricular and pedagogical changes that brought the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and The Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing to the forefront of course design.
Resource Type(s): Publication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved

Pages